Weather Emergencies

Floods

Flash flood are floods that result from rainwater that does not drain quickly. Thus, the water accumulates to flood conditions very quickly. Sometimes in just a few minutes. Some flash floods can reach heights of several feet and usually carry debris that can cause injury or death.

INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITIES

1. Plan in advance what you should do if a flash flood does occur.2. Determine what property may be in jeopardy. Where would you move your car to avoid damage?3. Use extreme caution! Never attempt to cross standing water on foot or in a vehicle.4. Monitor the local weather news for flood warnings.5. Check the Emergency Update and School Closing Line for updates or closings.6. Watch for washed out roads, earth slides, broken water or sewer mains, loose or downed electrical wires and falling or fallen objects.7. Report any emergency to Public Safety at:   -Manhattan:  x 6198 from a campus phone. (845) 261-9504 or (845)646-6198 from a private or public phone.   -Jersey City: (845) 222-8812 from a private or public phone.8. Emergency Response Coordinators will monitor TV, radio, and local information for flood watch and warning advisory statement information.

ADMINISTRATIVE DECISIONS

The Vice President and Treasurer in conjunction with the Facilities personnel will make decisions regarding control and access to buildings/areas affected by floods, and issuing or not issuing the “all clear” for safe building/area re-entry and continued occupancy.

Heat Waves

Heat wave:  A prolonged period of excessive heat and humidity.  The National Weather Service steps up its procedures to alert the public during these periods of excessive heat and humidity.

Heat index:  A number in degrees Fahrenheit (F) that tells how hot it really feels when relative humidity is added to the actual air temperature.  Exposure to full sunshine can increase the heat index by 15F.

Heat cramps:  Heat cramps are muscular pains and spasms due to heavy exertion.  They usually involve the abdominal muscles or legs.  It is generally thought that the loss of water from heavy sweating causes the cramps.

Heat exhaustion:  Heat exhaustion typically occurs when people exercise heavily or work in a warm humid place where body fluids are lost through heavy sweating.  Blood flow to the skin increases, causing blood flow to decrease to the vital organs.  This results in a form of mild shock.  If not treated, the victim’s condition will worsen.  Body temperature will keep rising and the victim may suffer heat stroke.

Heat stroke:  Heat stroke is life threatening.  The victim’s temperature control system, which produces sweating to cool the body, stops working.  The body temperature can rise so high that brain damage and death may result if the body is not cooled quickly.  (Also referred to as sunstroke.)

INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITIES

1. Slow down. Strenuous activities should be reduced, eliminated, or rescheduled to the coolest time of the day. Individuals at risk should stay in the coolest available place, not necessarily indoors.

2. Dress for summer. Lightweight, light-colored clothing reflects heat and sunlight and helps your body maintain normal temperatures.

3. Put less fuel on your inner fires. Foods (such as proteins) that increase metabolic heat production also increase water loss.

4. Drink plenty of water or other non-alcoholic fluids. Your body needs water to keep cool. Drink plenty of fluids, even if you don’t feel thirsty.

5. Persons who (1) have epilepsy or heart, kidney or liver disease, (2) are on fluid-restrictive diets or (3) have a problem with fluid retention should consult a physician before increasing their consumption of fluids.

6. Do not drink alcoholic beverages.

7. Spend more time in air-conditioned places.

8. Don’t get too much sun. Sunburn makes the job of heat dissipation that much more difficult.

Hurricanes

Hurricane Watch:  Issued for coastal areas when there is a threat of a hurricane to a specific area, generally within 36 hours.

Hurricane Warning:  Issued when hurricane conditions are expected in a specific coastal area in 24 hours or less.  Hurricane conditions include sustained winds of at least 74 miles per hour and/or dangerous high tides.

Category One:      73-95 mph                           Category Four:  131-155 mphCategory Two:     96-110 mph                          Category Five:   over 155 mphCategory Three:  111-130 mph

INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITIES

1. Plan in advance what you should do if a hurricane does occur.

2. Listen for information and instructions on radio television newscasts and check the Emergency Update and School Closing Line for updates and/or closings.

3. Keep a portable flashlight on hand—with fresh batteries.

4. Stay away from disaster areas.

5. Obey all emergency orders which are issued.

6. Obey all emergency orders from Public Safety and local authorities.

7. Be aware of road and bridge washouts and storm debris on walkways and roadways.

8. Avoid all downed power lines. Assume that all have live electricity.

ADMINISTRATIVE DECISIONS

The Vice President and Treasurer in conjunction with the Facilities personnel will make decisions regarding control and access to buildings/areas affected by hurricanes, and issuing or not issuing the “all clear” for safe building/area re-entry and continued occupancy.

Thunderstorms

Severe Thunderstorm Watch:  Conditions are right for a severe thunderstorm.

Severe Thunderstorm Warning:  A severe storm has been observed or has been detected by radar.

INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITIES

1. Remain calm. Get inside a building or car.2. Do not use the telephone, except for emergencies.3. Do not use bathtubs, water faucets, and sinks. Metal pipes can conduct electricity.4. A car offers some protection from lightning, but can be a dangerous place to be during a flash flood or tornado.5. Get to higher ground if flash flooding is possible6. Report any emergency to Public Safety at x7191 (from cell phone: 845.222.8812) on the Rockland Campus, or x6198 on the Manhattan Campus. If life threatening, dial 911.7. Emergency Response Coordinators will monitor TV, radio, and local information for flood watch and warning advisory statement information.

ADMINISTRATIVE DECISIONS

During severe weather, the Vice President and Treasurer in conjunction with the Executive Vice President may make the decision to close the campus, move certain offices or move people to shelter areas. Notifications will be made through the Telephone Contact System. A message will also be posted on the Emergency Announcement line.

IF OUTSIDE AND NO TIME TO REACH A SAFE BUILDING OR CAR:

1. Do not stand under a tall tree in an open area, on a hilltop, in an open field or on a beach. Get away from fences and poles.2. Get away from open water.3. Get away from all metal equipment.4. Get away from motorcycles, bicycles, and scooters. Do not hold metal objects.5. If you feel your skin tingle or your hair stand on end, squat low to the ground on the balls of your feet. Place your hands on your knees with your head between them. Make yourself the smallest target possible; minimize your contact with the ground.

Tornado

Tornado Watch:  The probability is dangerously high for a tornado to develop.  The National Weather Service specifies the time period in which the watch is in effect.

Tornado Warning:  An actual tornado has been seen or has been shown by radar.  If a tornado warning is given for your area, take shelter immediately.

INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITIES

1. Remain calm. This will help you to think clearly.

2. Relay the warning to others in the area and people that you are near or responsible to notify.

3. Go to an inside hallway or interior small room on the lowest floor possible (basement). Crouch near the floor or under heavy, well-supported objects and cover your head.

4. Stay away from windows, corridors with windows, or large freestanding expanses. Do not use elevators during a tornado warning.

5. Report any emergency to Public Safety at x7191 (from cell phone: 845.222.8812) on the Rockland Campus, or x6198 on the Manhattan Campus. If life threatening, dial 911.

6. Emergency Response Coordinators will monitor TV, radio, and local information for flood watch and warning advisory statement information.

ADMINISTRATIVE DECISIONS

During severe weather, the Vice President and Treasurer in conjunction with the Executive Vice President may make the decision to close the campus, move certain offices or move people to shelter areas. Notifications will be made through the Telephone Contact System. A message will also be posted on the Emergency Announcement line.

AFTER THE TORNADO

1. Help injured or trapped persons. Do not try to move the seriously injured unless they are in immediate danger.

2. Avoid all downed power lines. Assume that all have live electricity.

3. Stay out of damaged buildings.

4. Use telephone only for emergency calls.

Winter Storms

Winter Weather Advisory:  Winter weather conditions, such as cold, ice or snow, are expected to delay travel, cause major problems or create other types of dangerous conditions.

Winter Storm Watch:  Usually issued 24 hours before the start of the event.  Means potential exists for six-inch accumulations or more of ice and snow.

Winter Storm Warning:  Usually issued within 12 hours of the start of the event.  Means the occurrence of heavy snow, sleet or freezing rain is expected.

Blizzard Warning:  Heavy snow, high winds and dangerously low temperatures are expected.  Blizzards can cause severe weather conditions, such as zero visibility and life-threatening wind chill.

Frostbite:  A severe reaction to cold exposure that can permanently damage its victims.  Symptoms include a loss of feeling and a white or pale appearance in fingers, toes, nose and/or ear lobes.

Hypothermia:  Brought on when the body core temperature drops below normal.  Symptoms include uncontrollable shivering, slow speech, memory lapses, frequent stumbling and drowsiness.

INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITIES

1. Our VP & Treasurer (David Jennings) in conjunction with the VP for Academic Affairs (Dr. Turk) will determine the need to cancel classes and close.

2. Announcements and updates will be placed on the Nyack College web site (www.nyack.edu).

3. The college Emergency Update and School Closing lines, as well as the Nyack College Emergency Closing Notification Facebook group, will be updated for any kind of emergency, emergency bulletin, or school closing that would need to be communicated to the college community.

4. More widespread emergency information is available via the following resources:

Manhattan Campus: Listen to 770 AM or 95.5 FM in New York City, and 1510 AM or 105.5 FM in New Jersey. In the case of a more widespread emergency, information is available on Manhattan South’s radio station 85.4 FM.

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